Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: WDBJ7 HomeCollectionsCadets

Virginia Tech community comes together to remember a hero

April 09, 2010
  • Captain David Seth Mitchell died last October while supporting combating operations in Afghanistan. He was a U.S. Marine and a former member of Virginia Tech's Corps of Cadets.
Captain David Seth Mitchell died last October while supporting combating operations in Afghanistan. He was a U.S. Marine and a former member of Virginia Tech's Corps of Cadets.

On a windy spring day, the Virginia Tech community paused to remember one of its own.

"Once again we are gathered here in this sacred place to honor a fallen hero Captain David Seth Mitchell," said Virginia Tech Cadet Jorge Secada-Lovio.

Hundreds of Cadets stood at attention as Capt Mitchell was remembered for his love of the university and his dedication to our country.

"As long as these pylons stand Seth Mitchell will be remembered among those who have led the way," said Major General Jerry Allen with the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets.

That's because Mitchell's name is now forever etched in stone.

There are now 425 names on the memorial of Virginia Tedch graduates who have died in combat since World War I, including eight Hokies who have been killed since September 11th.

Advertisement

"It's a great honor for us also. It's a place that he loved and to know we can come here and see the place that he loved...he is part of its history now," said Capt Mitchell's father.

The family is overwhelmed by the university's generosity.

Mitchell's parents were presented with an American flag and a class ring but they admit this day is still a difficult one.

"He was a man of honor and he would be honored by having his name etched here. As parents it's a tremendous empty feeling for us," Mitchell's father explained.

******************************

The Virginia Tech community came together Friday afternoon to honor one of its own at the War Memorial.

Captain David Seth Mitchell died last October while supporting combating operations in Afghanistan.  He was a U.S. Marine and a former member of Virginia Tech's Corps of Cadets.

Friday afternoon, Mitchell's family was on hand as his name was engraved on the university's memorial.

Mitchell is the eighth Hokie to die in combat since September 11th.

"These eight represent the young men and women who today serve to make the world safe for democracy," said Charles Steger, Virginia Tech's president.

News7 Justin McLeod talked to Captain Mitchell's family. We'll hear from them and have more from Friday's ceremony on News7 at 10 & 11. 

News release regarding ceremony:

Virginia Tech to honor U.S. Marine Corps Capt. David Seth Mitchell on Ut Prosim Pylon

BLACKSBURG, Va., March 29, 2010 - The Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets will conduct a Pylon Dedication Ceremony at 3 p.m. Friday, April 9 at the War Memorial. The engraving of one additional veterans name, Capt. David Seth Mitchell, U.S. Marine Corps, on the Ut Prosim pylon will be dedicated.

Mitchells family will be guests and all university employees, alumni, friends, and veterans are encouraged and welcome to attend.

Mitchell, a 2001 graduate of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets was killed on Oct. 26, 2009, while supporting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He was stationed at Camp Pendleton, Calif., and was an AH-1 Super Cobra helicopter gunship pilot and a member of Marine Light Attack Squadron-367. He was 30 years old.

Mitchell is the fourth member of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Class of 2001 lost since graduation and the eighth Hokie to be lost on operations since Sept. 11. He was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery on Nov. 6.

Mitchell was from Loveland, Ohio, and graduated from Loveland High School in 1997. When he entered the corps, Mitchell was a member of Echo Company and then rose to become the Executive Officer of Golf Company during his senior year. He earned a degree in English from the College of Arts and Sciences and a minor in leadership studies. Mitchell was a member of the German Club and Ring Design Committee as well as the male member-at-large for the Class of 2001.

Upon graduation, Mitchell was assigned to Camp Lejuene, N.C., and served tours in Okinawa, Haiti, and Iraq as part of an infantry unit. He had dreamed of becoming a pilot, but poor eyesight left him unqualified for the military aviation program. After corrective eye surgery, he earned his private pilot's license and a Marine aviation training spot. He received his wings in May 2007 and later qualified to fly the AH-1 Super Cobra helicopter.

The Pylons are a representation of Virginia Techs values. The values engraved on the eight pylons are, from left to right: Brotherhood, Honor, Leadership, Sacrifice, Service, Loyalty, Duty, and Ut Prosim (That I May Serve).

The Pylons are etched with the names of every Virginia Tech student and graduate who has died defending our nations freedom beginning with those lost during World War I. At the War Memorials center, the cenotaph displays the names of Virginia Techs seven Congressional Medal of Honor recipients.

Virginia Tech has now lost eight former students who were killed during operations after Sept. 11. Our fallen and the dates of their deaths are

wdbj7 Articles
|
|
|